Archive for October, 2014
 

Cape Farewell, Greenland

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

The idea of the trip was to try and paddle around Cape Farewell from Nanortalik and return, attempting some Alpine ascents of any suitable peaks we came across along the way.

IMG_5481

Cape Farewell is at the southern tip of Greenland and exposed to the entire ocean swell, it is also a committing coast with high cliffs and no easy landings; we knew this would be the crux of the trip, and we also knew Cape Farewell is the windiest region in the world, so getting a good weather window would be vitally important.

IMG_5492

We shipped two barrels out to Neil Jepson at the Nanortalik Tourism Service a month before we left, these contained all the food packed into day bags and the climbing equipment; we left on the 12th of August, a little later than I usually go. The later departure was due to having to wait for the kayaks to be available, which were hired through Doug Copper of Glenmore Lodge from their fleet of P&H Capellas stored with Neil. Two days and 4 flights later, including 2 by helicopter, we arrived and were met by Neil; he was very helpful and we picked up the boats and barrels that day, meaning we were able to leave the next day.

IMG_5503

The Capellas had skegs and I was worried we wouldn’t get all the kit in; we had 23 days’ food, all the camping kit, two 50m ropes and climbing gear. It was a tight fit with the cockpit rammed and quite a bit of gear strapped to deck bags, but it all was in and we left around lunchtime on the 14th. The boats were very heavy and, because of the gear on the back, they weather cocked badly even with the skeg down; not ideal as we headed off into a side wind!

IMG_5536

The first headland we encountered was exposed to swell with no easy landings and we realised this could be an awkward on our return in bigger conditions. At our first campsite we stashed 3 food bags for our return as there looked like some possible climbing in the area on our return, this also got rid of some kit from back decks. The next few days we were in the shelter of an island system, then we had another exposed headland to a campsite at Ink Gait, the site of an old Viking settlement over 1000 years ago. We camped in the ruins of an old church and also had our first encounter with a Minke Whale who came very close!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The following day we had a mountaineering day with a rope and small rack and climbed Ikiagtqaqot to 900m, a lovely ridge scramble with small pitches of scrambling and stunning views in
good weather. We managed to get a mobile signal as we had a view of the settlement of Frederiksdal and the forecast seemed ok. We did work out on the trip that the weather changes very fast and the difference between a report from Nanortalik and out on the coast could be vast.

We did decide to go for the crux of the trip and attempt Cape Christian and Cape Farewell, this would be a big day in distance and we had a lot of fog to deal with at the start. Cape Christian eventually appeared out of the fog, but as we came around the headland the wind suddenly increased and we were faced with the sight of a large area of breaking waves over some low islands in front. The wind was now blowing hard from behind and we struggled to get the heavy boats around into the swell and wind, so we decided we had to land on a very rocky shore. Although it was a difficult landing on a boulder beach, we were glad to be safe as the wind steadily increased; we were storm bound here all day, and although the wind eased by the next day, the swell was still big.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We crossed the bay and as we came around the Cape, the fog came in and the wind increased, but luckily after struggling around the wind eased. There were no easy landings, so we had to stay in our boats ’til we found a little shelter; eventually we landed at the west tip of Eggers Island and the following day did a new climb of 8 pitches on the scabby side of Quvperitqaqa, a grade HVS 5a called Dance with Seals.

The next few days we had good weather paddling down Ikaq Fjord, but we again got caught out crossing Anordliutssup Ima when the wind and waves picked up to a force 5 and we were committed to cross. We stopped briefly in the village of Augpilagtoq, where the villagers told us they had shot a polar bear a few weeks ago; this was our only stop in 3 weeks. We were storm bound for a day close to here, but the weather improved again and we headed south down Torssukatak Fjord, again we hit bad, windy weather at the end of the fjord and had to turn and run to find shelter. The weather was definitely changing and following a pattern of calm in the morning and windy in the afternoon, so we got early starts and got back into the shelter of Iglu Kasip Tunua Fjord, where we knew there was an old hut where we left some food; we had a day here stormbound, then headed down the fjord and camped.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We spent 3 days here, one day again sheltering from rain, but the second day, although it was foggy, we went to try and climb a big mountain face we had seen. As we climbed, we came out of the cloud and the face was bigger than we thought, 12 pitches later we reached the top; some good climbing and the usual loose rock on a big mountain face. The climb was graded at E1 5B and we called it Keeping the Faith. We now had a week left to explore another area we had seen closer to Nanortalik; we had to negotiate another headland we had passed when it was windy the day before, but when we woke up from camp it was flat and calm in the bay we were in.

We set off and as soon as we headed onto the open sea we got the swell and wind, the next hour we battled around the tide; the swell and wind created some of the biggest seas I have ever been in and any rescue was out of question. We made it into bay and landed, once again the wind got stronger as the afternoon wore on, so we found a sheltered spot for the tent; it was now bitterly cold with snow on the tops.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As we were now in sight of Nanortalik, I managed to get a phone signal and got a weather forecast. More bad weather was coming in 2 days, so we decided the following day to head back in rather than be stormbound again. The following day was calm and we headed back in around mid afternoon for showers and beers. We had finished a few days early, but we had succeeded in all our objectives and felt happy that we had survived some very challenging conditions.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Distance Paddled:

270km over a 21 day period (approx. 15 paddle days, 4 days stormbound and 3 climbing days)

 

Kayaks:

2x Plastic P&H Capella 166s with Skegs

 

 

Paddlers:

2x Werner Paddles and 1 Set of Spare Paddles

 

 

Paddling Kit:

Palm Aleutian Dry Suits

Palm Buoyancy Aids

Palm Nova Wellies

Palm Spray Decks

 

 

 

Tent:

Terra Nova Heavy Duty Hyperspace

 

 

 

Sleeping Bags:

Mountain Equipment Titan 850 Down Bags

 

 

Stove:

MSR Whisperlite Combo

 

 

Climbing Kit:

2x DMM Alpine Harnesses

2x 9.8 m DMM 50M Ropes

12x Quick Draws

5x Slings and Krabs

Double Set of Wires 1-10

9 Assorted Cams

Helmets

Rock Boots

 

 

Other Gear:

30m EPIRB

VHF RADIO

Mobiles (although only a few places had phone coverage)

Various Camera Kit

 

 

The Team Would Like to Thank the Following:

P&H Sea Kayaks

Gino Watkins Funding and Arctic Club

Welsh Sports Association

BMC

Palm

Mountain Equipment

Werner Paddles

DMM

Cotswold Camping

Wild West Beef Jerky

A to Z Expeditions

Bromsgrove School

 

P&H Hammer Vs “The Shubie”

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

We just had Canadian Thanksgiving last weekend and what better way to burn off the turkey then to head out for a paddle. Not just any paddle but a paddle on “The Shubie” tidal bore.

There as no bore on this day but the tidal range was around 49 feet and it would be the first time I would use the hammer.

“The Shubie” tidal bore is a world class sea kayak play sport. It bore runs on a river called the Shubenacadie River located at the top of the Bay of Fundy. This video was shot on a tidal range of 49.3 feet. The river is a magical place and the hammer has to be in the top 3 boats I have used on the “The Shubie”.

Once the hammer was up to speed I was able to do cutbacks, bottom turns and surf waves for 2 to 3 minutes at a time. My fears were eased after the first small set on the river.  The hammer picked up the waves quickly.

ThePddler

 

I was once told the hammer was to slow for “The Shubie” but after paddling it I would have to say it was one of my best days on the river. In this video there was no Bore wave to speak of but depending on the conditions there is a great front leading wave that forms a fun play wave and once it does up the river it leave us with plenty more things to play on. come to Nova Scotia.

You will be glad you did. There is a full writeup about “The Shubie” in ThePaddler online magazine

I hope you like the video


Search

Admin
Log in
Pages
Blog Home
  • Sample Page
  • Archives
  • November 2017
  • August 2017
  • May 2017
  • April 2017
  • March 2017
  • February 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • September 2016
  • August 2016
  • July 2016
  • April 2016
  • August 2015
  • October 2014
  • September 2014
  • August 2014
  • May 2014
  • April 2014
  • February 2014
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • June 2013
  • May 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • May 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • August 2011
  • July 2011
  • June 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • February 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009
  • November 2009
  • October 2009
  • September 2009
  • August 2009
  • July 2009
  • June 2009
  • May 2009
  • April 2009
  • March 2009
  • February 2009
  • January 2009
  • November 2008
  • October 2008
  • August 2008
  • July 2008
  • June 2008
  • April 2008
  • February 2008
  • January 2008
  • November 2007
  • September 2007
  • August 2007
  • July 2007
  • June 2007
  • May 2007
  • April 2007
  • March 2007
  • February 2007
  • January 2007
  • January 1970
  • Categories
  • Expeditions (9)
  • News (19)
  • Reviews (9)
  • Technical (7)
  • Trip Reports (827)
  • Contributors
  • P&H Paddlers Admin
  • Björn Nehrhoff V. H.
  • Brian Day
  • Christopher Lockyer
  • Dimitri Vandepoele
  • Doug Cooper
  • Gethin Roberts
  • Jay Rose
  • Jim Krawiecki
  • Kate Duffus
  • Mark Kalch
  • Olly Sanders
  • P&H Sea Kayaks
  • P&H Custom Sea Kayaks
  • Paul Kuthe
  • Robert Moffatt
  • Roger Chandler
  • Sid Sinfield